Meredosia Pipeline Construction

Backlit Forest by Cyrene Krey
Along the way to a lake we wanted to photograph at night, Winifred Bird, friend and journalist, and I stumbled across a construction site. Needing to check the map, we decided to pull off on the side of the road and see if any of the workers would speak to us. However, we soon found out that although floodlights and generators were running, nobody was in sight.
Photographing an Empty Construction Site by Cyrene Krey
Winnie and I photographed the empty site while looking for someone to talk to. Eventually we decided to continue on towards the lake.
Construction Work at Night by Cyrene Krey
After leaving the first construction site for the lake, we stumbled across a second site. People were there and we decided to stop and try to talk to them. Unfortunately security believed we were there to make trouble. Although we remained in the car, they accused us of being there to make trouble. We soon left, but they followed, prompting me to stop and photograph the site. They claimed there had been problems at the site previously, although locals denied that. Considering the hostile behavior we received from security, we opted to skip the lake and go back in the morning along another route that allowed to avoid further harassment.

More photos from this project can be viewed at my website, www.cyrenekrey.com.

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Winifred Bird Photographing DAPL Site by Cyrene Krey

Patoka, IL DAPL Site

I’ve mentioned a little bit about my trip along the Dakota Access Pipeline to see some of the natural habitats and wildlife that may be impacted by the pipeline’s route. Now it’s time to start sharing a few of those photos and stories!

Water Pipe Flags by Cyrene Krey
Behind these flags for water pipelines and this fire hydrant, is a storage yard for the pipes needed to complete construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Right next to this site is the final endpoint for the pipeline in Patoka, IL. This is where I began my journey, accompanied by my friend and journalist Winnie Bird.
Winifred Bird Photographing DAPL Site by Cyrene Krey
We weren’t allowed onto the site, so we photographed from the road and ditches around the site. Security kept a close eye on us all the time, driving around the site and the roads to keep us in view and reluctant to talk to us.
Birds Flocking in a Cloudy Sky by Cyrene Krey
This flock of birds maintained a presence at the site. They huddled together on the construction materials until disturbed by the trucks driving around the site. They would then gather in the bright blue sky until they once again resumed their posts.

Some of these photos will also be shared on my website at www.cyrenekrey.com and you’re invited to like my Facebook page where I’ll continue posting my wildlife and project photos 🙂

Breeding garden slugs by Cyrene Krey

Breeding Slugs

A pair of breeding gray garden slugs by Cyrene Krey

This fall, during one of my exploratory walks around my yard, I discovered a pair of breeding gray garden slugs. Slugs are hermaphrodites, meaning they contain both male and female reproductive organs. Although they are able to self-fertilize, they usually mate with another slug.

Breeding garden slugs by Cyrene Krey
Slugs, shell-less snails, can be found in higher numbers after it rains, preferring moist environments. 
Tiny slug by Cyrene Krey
Just a few feet away, I saw several smaller slugs around a pile of leaf litter. They’re considered a pest because they’ve become so common in home gardens and destroy vegetable seedlings. They eat holes in leaves and stems which harms the plants and I often see them out enjoying my blackberry bushes.
Gray Garden Slug by Cyrene Krey
Despite being considered pests, slugs are vital members of their ecosystems. They play an important role in the decomposition of vegetative litter as well as important nutrient recyclers which aid in the maintenance of soil health.
Mating Slugs by Cyrene Krey
If you absolutely must reduce the population of slugs in your garden, avoid harsh chemicals. One alternative to deal with them is to encourage predators, such as toads, snakes, and beetles near the garden. These guys will eat the slugs and also give you more wildlife to appreciate.

As always, you’re welcome to view more of these photos on my website at www.cyrenekrey.com and I’d love it you liked my Facebook page for even more wildlife facts and photos! I’ll be giving away quite a bit of goodies soon to clear out my old inventory, so now’s a great time to start following my page if you aren’t already 🙂

For more information on these cool critters, check out the following resources:

University of Illinois Extension: Slugs by Phil Nixon

Economic Impacts of the Conservation of the Mojave Shoulderband Snail (Helminthoglypta ‘Coyote’ Greggi) by Cyrene Krey

Goh, K. (1988). Gray Garden Slug: Deroceras reticultatum. Field Crops Fact Sheet No. 102GFS795.00